Publikationen

M. Laumann et al.

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Michael Laumann Eberhard-Karls Universität Tübingen,
Abteilung für Evolutionsbiologie der Invertebraten,
Auf der Morgenstelle 28E, 72076 Tübingen, Germany;


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Roy A. Norton State University of New York, Department of Environmental & Forest Biology,
1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA

 
Michael Heethoff Eberhard-Karls Universität Tübingen,
Abteilung für Evolutionsbiologie der Invertebraten,
Auf der Morgenstelle 28E, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
 

 

Acarine embryology: Inconsistencies, artificial results and misinterpretations


Abstract

In this paper, we discuss how views of early stages in acarine embryology – from the first cleavage to the blastula – have changed over time, starting with historical works of the 19th century and ending with electron microscopic analyses in the 21st century. Our goal is to identify errors and inconsistencies in both observations and the interpretation of information throughout this time span, and to show how they have related to technical improvements. Surprisingly, the questions about cleavage pattern and its implications for acarine classification have not changed, despite the advent of electron microscopy and molecular biology.
In the last century authors attempted to develop a general concept of cleavage types and their distribution among the major subgroups of the Acari. Based on available data, all of which was from light microscopy, the type of cleavage for both the Anactinotrichida and Actinotrichida was considered to be interlecithal, with the exception that some actinotrichid mites show mixed/combination cleavage. Newer data obtained by transmission electron microscopy and molecular biology point to a very different generalization: early acarine cleavage seems to be a special type of total cleavage.

Keywords

total cleavage, superficial cleavage, Acari, macromere, micromere, Oribatida, Archegozetes longisetosus, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)


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