Museum Frankfurt

Whales

Blick in die Ausstellung "Wale"

Whales, dolphins, and porpoises belong to the order Cetacea - a wordmix from the Greek "ketosis" for whales, and the Latin "cetus" for large marine animals. 85 species of whales live today in the oceans and major rivers, including 70 toothed whales and 15 baleen whales. Our exhibition gives an overview of the species, their diet, anatomy and development. We show five skeletons of modern whales and three prehistoric whales. The Amazon River dolphin and harbour porpoise are on display in Room 102 (first floor).

 


 

Dorudon   Fossil whales – deep water predators
In the transition from aquatic mammals to whales, we show skeletal and image reconstructions of prehistoric whales: Ambulocetus, Basilosaurus and Dorudon. The fossils show how they evolved from terrestrial hoofed animals over millions of years, finally into ocean-going mammals.


Finback whale – the second largest living creature
The exhibited skeleton is 22 meters long. The body outline on the wall illustrates the enormous size of this animal. The mouth is so big that a small group of visitors easily finds space inside. Try it out! Also enormous in size is the real heart of a sei whale exhibited here.
   Finnwal



Schwertwal  

Orcas – the biggest predator dolphins
Forty sharp teeth make it clear that the Orca is a dangerous fighter. Its prey, which it often hunts in groups, includes seals, other whales, and penguins. The German name "sword whale", refers to the very large and sword-shaped "dorsal fin", which is especially characteristic of the males.

 



 
Narwhal – Unicorn of the Sea
The spirally twisted "tusk" of these whales apparently inspired the unicorn legend. Previously, magical properties were ascribed to the horn, which actually corresponds to a canine tooth. The "tusk", which usually only occurs in the males, can reach up to 2.5 meters in length. It is not used for hunting. Presumably, it served like a deer's antlers, to impress females and rivals.
   Entenwal



Narwal   Narwhal – Unicorn of the Sea
The spirally twisted "tusk" of these whales apparently inspired the unicorn legend. Previously, magical properties were ascribed to the horn, which actually corresponds to a canine tooth. The "tusk", which usually only occurs in the males, can reach up to 2.5 meters in length. It is not used for hunting. Presumably, it served like a deer's antlers, to impress females and rivals.

 

https://die-welt-baut-ihr-museum.de/en