Senckenberg Publications

Special Issue I

Special Issue I

TOPICAL VIRTUAL ISSUE
on Recent Advances in Chondrocranium Research, Guest Editor: Ingmar Werneburg
The following published papers are available online.

WERNEBURG, I. & W. MAIER
Diverging development of akinetic skulls in cryptodire and pleurodire turtles: an ontogenetic and phylogenetic study.
DOI: 10.26049/VZ69-2-2019-01
VZ Special Issue
YARYHIN, O.& I. WERNEBURG
The origin of orbitotemporal diversity in lepidosaurs: insights from tuatara chondrocranial anatomy.
DOI: 10.26049/VZ69-2-2019-04

Cover image
Illustration of the embryonic skull of a tuatara, Sphenodon punctatus Gray, 1831 (Reptilia, Rhynchocephalia), with a total body length of 58 mm (left skull side; redrawn by Margret Roser after Werner 1962, fig. 11, using the manual air brush technique; with kind permission of Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Maier, Tübingen, Germany). The image highlights the mutual developmental and morphological integration of the three major skeletal components of the vertebrate skull, in general. In its centre is the primordial cartilaginous skull, the chondrocranium, in blue (known as neurocranium with the braincase when ossified). It is surrounded by the dermatocranium (i.e., dermal bones), in brown. Both partly articulate with the viscerocranium (syn. splanchnocranium, pharyngeal elements), shown in pink (palatoquadrate and Meckel’s cartilage) and yellow (hyoid apparatus, i.e. branchial arches). For further details on general skull construction and intracranial mobility, see Werneburg & Maier (2019, this issue). An updated treatment of tuatara chondrocranial anatomy and its importance for understanding orbitotemporal diversity in lepidosaur reptiles can be found in Yaryhin & Werneburg (2019, this issue; see also there for the bibliographic details of Gray 1831 and Werner 1962).

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