Young Scientists

Young Scientists

Dear fellow Senckenbergers,

We are the representatives of BSc, MSc, graduate trainees, PhDs, and post-docs conducting their research at Senckenberg.

We act as an interface between students, supervisors and our administration.

Get involved!

What we do:

  • Network across Senckenberg locations through monthly meetings and a yearly retreat.
  • Advocate for Young Scientists through our role in the Wissenschaftsausschuss (scientific advisory board to the board of directors) and regular meetings with a member of the board of directors.
  • Provide support: bring us your ideas & problems.
  • Inform about training programs and administrative procedures.
  • Exchange with other networks (Leibniz PhD Network, ).

Would you like to be added to our email list or get more involved?

Then please send us an e-mail at youngscientists@senckenberg.de

Your Young Scientists Team

We are looking for interested people from Müncheberg, Tübingen and Weimar!

Events

Young Scientists Retreat

Save the date! Our next retreat will be in Görlitz from 15 – 16 July 2020

We organize annual Young Scientists Retreats, which started in Wilhelmshaven in 2008 and are held alternately in Frankfurt and at the other Senckenberg locations.

Our Young Scientists Retreat is a great way to network, learn more about Senckenberg, and share your research.

  • See and be seen: Present your current research, thesis, or a (planned) project through science slams, talks and posters.
    Insights into Senckenberg: Learn more about structures and processes within Senckenberg and discuss with a representative from the board of directors.
  • Benefit from the Senckenberg network: Get to know other scientists, exchange ideas and benefit from new collaborations and our experience. Invited guests give lectures on interesting research going on at Senckenberg or Young Scientist-specific topics, such as mentoring, third-party funding, etc.
  • Travel to new places: Get to know the other Senckenberg locations, their research areas, facilities and staff.
  • Have fun! Every retreat includes an excursion – we have walked through the “Watt” in Wilhelmshaven, looked at geological formations in the Sächsische Schweiz, explored fossil beds at the Grube Messel, and searched for beavers in the Spessart.

Monthly meetings

On the first Monday of each month at 4 pm, all Young Scientists are invited to meet via Skype. Discussions are led by the main and local speakers, who are always looking for feedback and ideas from their fellow Young Scientists. We discuss topics from the different Senckenberg locations, from our working groups (see below), and plan our local speaker meetings and the Young Scientists retreats. Please email us if you would like to join a meeting. We are always excited by new members, even if you just want to sit in and listen and learn what’s going on. Often a group from your location is already participating so by getting in touch with your local speaker you can just add yourself to the meeting. Monthly meetings are also a good way to learn how to get more involved. We always need help and are good at adapting to as little or as much time as you can offer.

Find our work on Twitter! Look for the hashtag #YSatSGN

Our Team

Each year at the annual retreat we vote for people to fill the positions listed below.

For August 2019 – July 2020, the following people were elected:

 

Main Speaker

Theresa Stratmann
Ph.D. Student, Member of Research Group 'Movement Ecology'

RESEARCH INTERESTS

 

My research interest is in conservation biology and how we can use math and modeling to make better decisions regarding conservation. While studying my master’s degree I used bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) as a case study for how we can resource-efficiently locate and survey rare and elusive species. This work combined species distribution modeling and intensive field work in close collaboration with state wildlife agencies in the United States to give me first-hand experience into what it means to conserve species at ground-level. For my Ph. D. I am changing my focus to examine how movement affects population dynamics in highly mobile animals. My study system is the Eastern Steppe of Mongolia and the nomadic Mongolian Gazelles (Procapra gutturosa). I will simulate this system by programming an herbivore-vegetation model. To do this I am combining expertise from the two working groups I am involved in. I am a part of Thomas Müller’s group, whose focus is on movement ecology and conservation, and Thomas Hickler’s group, whose focus is on vegetation modeling and effects of climate change. We hope this modeling approach will help us better understand how important mobility is to long-term population persistence of animals living in unpredictable and dynamic landscapes.

Past Projects:

B.S. Ecology, Minor Mathematics, summa cum laude,  The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA,  (Lab of Dr. John Maerz: click here)

M.S. Wildlife and Fisheries Biology,  Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA,  (Lab of Dr. Kyle Barrett: click here)

 

CURRENT PROJECTS

My work is part of the BMBF project MoreStep which brings together social and ecological sciences to identify societal drivers that can lead to an ecological tipping point of the Mongolian steppe ecosystem. Our role is to use the herbivore-vegetation model to examine the importance of movement in maintaining sustainable numbers of wild and domestic herbivores. The model will also be used to disentangle the effects of climate and grazing on vegetation. 

CV

Researchgate

Stratmann, T. S. M., T. Floyd, and K. Barrett (2020): Habitat and History Influence Abundance of Bog Turtles. The Journal of Wildlife Management 84(2):331–343. DOI: 10.1002/jwmg.21793

 

Nandintsetseg, D., C. Bracis, … , T. Stratmann, and T. Mueller. Challenges in the conservation of wide-ranging nomadic species. Journal of Applied Ecology. 56(8): 1916-1926.

Check out the animation I made for the paper here.

 

Stratmann, T. S. M., T. Floyd, and K. Barrett (2016): Locating suitable habitat for a rare species: evaluation of a species distribution model for Bog Turtles ( Glyptemys muhlenbergii) in the southeastern United States. Herpetological Conservation and Biology. 11(1): 199-213.

 

Munscher, E., A. Walde, T. S. M. Stratmann, and B. Butterfield (2015): Exceptional Growth Rates Observed in Immature Pseudemys from a Protected Spring System in Florida. Herpetology Notes. 8: 133-140.

 

Pierson, T., T. S. M. Stratmann, E. White, A. Clause, C. Carter, M. Herr, A. Jenkins, H. Vogel, M. Knoerr, and B. Folt (2014): New County Records of Amphibians and Reptiles Resulting from a Bioblitz Competition in North-Central Georgia, USA. Herpetological Review. 45(2): 296-297.

 

Floyd, T.M., T.S.M. Stratmann, G.J. Brown, III, and C.S. Pfaff (2013): Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis. Terrestrial Movement. Herpetological Review. 44:651.

 

Stratmann, T. and S. Pfaff (2011): Geographic Distribution Note for Lampropeltis elapsoides. Herpetological Review. 42(4):572-573.

Treasurers

Mitarbeiter Alexander Neu
Alexander Neu
Ph. D.Student, Member of Senior Scientist Group 'Functional Ecology and Global Change'

Research interests

ProteaNet: Spatiotemporal dynamics of plant-animal interaction networks

ProteaNet is the follow-up project of ProteaBird and investigates Protea communities in South African fynbos. I will extend spatial and short-term analyses of ProteaBird, conducted by Baptiste Schmid and Henning Nottebrock, and will study how plant-based resources determine long-term dynamics of animal communities. I will address fundamental ecological questions about mechanisms that underlie life-history variation, species coexistence, and the structuring of mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interaction networks.

I will specifically study the resource allocation for animal-mediated indirect interactions among Protea plants. I will also test how the spatiotemporal dynamics of Protea-based resources (nectar, pollen, seeds) affect the functional and interaction diversity of bird, rodent, and insect pollinators and seed predators. This will enable us to investigate how mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interaction networks assemble in space and time and how the spatiotemporal dynamics of these networks affect plant community dynamics.

I am working under the supervision of PD Dr. Matthias Schleuning. The project is conducted together with Prof. Dr. Frank Schurr and the PhD student Huw Cooksley from the University of Hohenheim, in collaboration with Prof. Dr. Karen Esler and with Prof. Dr. Anton C. Pauw at the University of Stellenbosch. The project is funded by the German Research Foundation.

Functional diversity of birds along land-use and elevational gradients on Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

For my Diploma thesis, I worked within the DFG-funded research unit KiLi. The aim was to test whether differences in avian ecomorphological traits depict the functional roles (dietary and foraging preferences) of bird species on Mount Kilimanjaro. I also investigated changes in the functional diversity of the bird communities along an elevational gradient and with land-cover change. This research gives insights into how anthropogenic impacts could modify ecosystem functions of birds.

Keywords
Mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interaction Networks, Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, Functional diversity, Pollination by animals, Observational and experimental field studies, Trait-based network Analysis

Press coverage

Citizen Science

Vögel beobachten und mitteilen  [German] SWR, 7 Feb 2017

CV

Leibniz Representatives

Mitarbeiterfoto
M.Sc. Nathan Baker
Doktorand

Website

Mitarbeiter Alexander Neu
Alexander Neu
Ph. D.Student, Member of Senior Scientist Group 'Functional Ecology and Global Change'

Research interests

ProteaNet: Spatiotemporal dynamics of plant-animal interaction networks

ProteaNet is the follow-up project of ProteaBird and investigates Protea communities in South African fynbos. I will extend spatial and short-term analyses of ProteaBird, conducted by Baptiste Schmid and Henning Nottebrock, and will study how plant-based resources determine long-term dynamics of animal communities. I will address fundamental ecological questions about mechanisms that underlie life-history variation, species coexistence, and the structuring of mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interaction networks.

I will specifically study the resource allocation for animal-mediated indirect interactions among Protea plants. I will also test how the spatiotemporal dynamics of Protea-based resources (nectar, pollen, seeds) affect the functional and interaction diversity of bird, rodent, and insect pollinators and seed predators. This will enable us to investigate how mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interaction networks assemble in space and time and how the spatiotemporal dynamics of these networks affect plant community dynamics.

I am working under the supervision of PD Dr. Matthias Schleuning. The project is conducted together with Prof. Dr. Frank Schurr and the PhD student Huw Cooksley from the University of Hohenheim, in collaboration with Prof. Dr. Karen Esler and with Prof. Dr. Anton C. Pauw at the University of Stellenbosch. The project is funded by the German Research Foundation.

Functional diversity of birds along land-use and elevational gradients on Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

For my Diploma thesis, I worked within the DFG-funded research unit KiLi. The aim was to test whether differences in avian ecomorphological traits depict the functional roles (dietary and foraging preferences) of bird species on Mount Kilimanjaro. I also investigated changes in the functional diversity of the bird communities along an elevational gradient and with land-cover change. This research gives insights into how anthropogenic impacts could modify ecosystem functions of birds.

Keywords
Mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interaction Networks, Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, Functional diversity, Pollination by animals, Observational and experimental field studies, Trait-based network Analysis

Press coverage

Citizen Science

Vögel beobachten und mitteilen  [German] SWR, 7 Feb 2017

CV

Local Speakers

10_Jürgen SchulzMolgen Team
Franziska Patzold
Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin
Dresden

General Information
Maria Franziska Patzold
franziska.patzold@senckenberg.de

Education
01/2018 — today PhD Position; Senckenberg Gesellschaft fur Naturforschung, Research
Museum of Zoology, Dresden, Topic: Evolutionary Genomics of Central Asian
Hawkmoths
10/2015 — 12/2017 Master Biology; Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg; Halle(Saa1e)
Topic of the master thesis: Identification of QTL for resistance against Puccinia
hordei in selected families of Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare in an nested
association mapping population (NAM HEB-25)
10/2012 — 10/2015 Bachelor Biology; Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle(Saa1e);
Topic of the bachelor thesis: The correlation between populationsize and
epigenetic Variation in Phyteuma spicatum
10/2007 — 10/2012 Study of Law; Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg; Halle (Saale),
University of Leipzig, Leipzig
08/1996 – 10/2007 —  higher education entrance qualification, Johann-Gottfried-Herder
Gymnasium; Halle(Saa1e)

Professional Experience
08/2016 Habit.art — Ecology and Faunistik; biologic consultant;
Tasks: location and dokumentation of stroke Victims in bats at wind power
stations
12/2015 — 01/2016 Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg; research assistant;
Tasks: data processing

O7/2014 — O8/2014 Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg; research assistant;
Tasks: structuring and dokumentation of the status of planting projects within
the DFG project BE LOW.
O8/2014 — O9/2014 Landwirtschaftliche Untersuchungs- u. Forschungsanstalt
Saatgutpriifung u. — anerkennung; student employee;
Tasks: preparation of seeds for the examination of the germination ability
and differentiation of seed traits in Barley

Franziska Leonhardt
Dresden
Mitarbeiterfoto
Dennis Schreiber
Ph.D. Student, Member of Research Group 'Molecular Ecology'
Frankfurt

Project: Genomic traces of introgressive hybridization and its impact on local Adaptation 

Research interests
In my PhD project I focus on introgressive hybridization on the genomic level within multiple phyla. Since at least around 10% of animal and 25% of plants species are known to occasionally hybridize, studying the evolutionary consequences of introduced genetic material is mandatory (e.g. enhanced adaptation to local biotic and abiotic factors). To find genomic traces of introgressive hybridization, whole genome sequencing of two Radix, Chironomus and Felis MOTUs as well as their respective hybrids will be conducted. By comparing the impact of hybridization on the genome level of these distantly related phyla we will reveal general genomic pattern as well as differences that occur when species hybridize.

Short CV

Since 05/2017 PhD on “Genomic traces of introgressive hybridization and its impact on local adaptation” in the Molecular Ecology Group at the Senckenberg Biodiversity & Climate Research Centre Frankfurt

10/2014 – 03/2017 M.Sc. Environmental Biosciences, University of Trier, 
Study emphasis: Biodiversity and Ecology, Master thesis: “Climate Niche Differentiation in Radix balthica”

10/2010 – 03/2015 B.Sc Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Campus Landau 
Bachelor thesis: “Diversity of earthworm communities in field margins: influence of the distance to the field on biodiversity”

Rafael Spiekermann
Doktorand, Paläobotanik
Frankfurt
Jordi de Raad
Ph.D. student, Member of Research Group 'Evolutionary vertebrate genomics' and Young Research Group 'Transposable Elements'
Frankfurt

Research Interests

As a molecular ecologist, I have always been amazed by the rapid-evolving fields of genomics and genetics and its underlying potential. I am mainly interested in applying genomic and genetic methods to elucidate evolutionary uncertainties and to contribute to the conservation of our biodiversity.  During my Msc thesis, I have worked on the genetics of the endangered Eurasian Black Vulture, resulting in a general interest in the (highly conserved) genome of birds. Currently, I am working on evolutionary genomics and geneticsin passerine birds. The aim is to resolve phylogenies, examine evolutionaryhistories and to link this data with varying ecological and morphologicaltraits.

Short CV

2018 – present Ph.D. student at the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (SBiK-F), Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Working group of Prof. Dr. Axel Janke

2015 – 2017 Msc Environmental Biology at the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands. Thesis topic: “First insights in the reintroduction of the Eurasian Black Vulture (Aegypius monachus) in Southern-France – evaluating individual contribution, genetic diversity and population genetic structure”. Supervised by dr. Peter Galbusera and Philippe Helsen

2014 – 2015 Student assistant at the department of Biology and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands.

2009 – 2013 Bsc Biology at the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Mitarbeiterfoto
M.Sc. Nathan Baker
Doktorand
Gelnhausen
Mitarbeiterfoto
Sarah Müller
Doktorandin
Gelnhausen
Neele Meyer
Neele Meyer
Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin
Wilhelmshaven

2011 – 2014        Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) Geowissenschaften an der Universität Bremen

Thema der Bachelorarbeit: Impact of simulated ocean acidification on the sediment production of the sponge Cliona orientalis Thiele, 1900 (Porifera: Clionaidae), durchgeführt am Senckenberg am Meer

2014 – 2017        Master of Science (M. Sc.) Marine Geosciences an der Universität Bremen

Thema der Master Arbeit: Bioerosion Patterns in a Polar Carbonate Factory (Mosselbukta, Svalbard), durchgeführt am Senckenberg am Meer

2015                      ein Auslandssemester an der University of Waikato, Hamilton, Neuseeland

seit 2017              wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin im Projekt: Patterns and Pace of Polar Bioerosion (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft WI 3754/3-1) in der Abteilung Meeresforschung, Arbeitsgruppe Meeresgeologie, Senckenberg am Meer

seit 2017              Doktorandin an der Universität Bremen, Fachbereich Geowissenschaften (FB5) 

seit 2018              Local Young Scientist Speaker / (Social) Media Officer der Young Scientists

 

Forschungsschwerpunkte
Bioerosion

Ichnotaxonomie

M. Wisshak, A. Bartholomä, L. Beuck, J. Büscher, A. Form, A. Freiwald, J. Halfar, S. Hetzinger, B. van Heugten, K. Hissmann, P. Holler, N. Meyer, H. Neumann, J. Raddatz, A. Rüggeberg, S. Teichert, A. Wehrmann (2017) Habitat characteristics and carbonate cycling of macrophyte-supported polar carbonate factories (Svalbard) – Cruise No. MSM55 – June 11 – June 29, 2016 – Reykjavik (Iceland) – Longyearbyen (Norway). MARIA S. MERIAN-Berichte, MSM55, 58 pp., DFG-Senatskommission für Ozeanographie, DOI:10.2312/cr_msm55 

Wisshak M, Meyer N, Radtke G & Golubic S (2018) Saccomorpha guttulata – a new marine fungal microbioerosion trace fossil from cool- to cold-water settings. Paläontologische Zeitschrift
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12542-018-0407-7

CHL Schönberg, FH Gleason, N Meyer, M Wisshak (2019) Close encounters in the substrate: when macroborers meet microborers. Facies 65 (2) 22. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10347-019-0567-2

N Meyer, M Wisshak, CHL Schönberg (2019) Sponge bioerosion versus aqueous pCO2: morphometric assessment of chips and etching fissures. Facies 65 (3), 27. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10347-019-0558-3

 

 

Dr. Sven Rossel
Leitung Proteomic Laboratory
Wilhelmshaven